75 Years And Older Patients With Brain Tumor May Benefit From More Aggressive Treatment

A new study from University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UHCMC) finds that elderly patients – 75 years old and older– with malignant brain tumors are not treated as aggressively as patients between 65 and 75 years old.

Furthermore, the researchers find that if patients over 75 years old are treated aggressively, such as with surgery and radiation, they have better survival rates. The findings appear in the April issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare-linked database, the researchers led by Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan, Ph.D., of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, looked at the records of 1753 patients who were treated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and of 205 patients treated for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) between 1991 and 1999.

GBMs are the most common malignant brain tumors in adults. AAs are less common, but are treated similarly to GBMs. Both have a poor prognosis, and as the American population ages, the incidence of these brain tumors is on the rise.

The researchers looked at whether patients received a biopsy only, surgery only, biopsy and radiation, surgery and radiation, or surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. These findings suggest that older patients with brain tumors do not receive the more aggressive, effective therapies and hence have worse survival.

Source: Eurekalert

Posted in: Health NewsNervous System Disorders

RSSComments (0)

Trackback URL

Leave a Reply